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Combining convenience and tranquillity

Combining convenience and tranquillity

It can be difficult to blend a quiet location with proximity to transport, shops and schools. If you’re struggling to find serenity with a train line outside your home, or highways and industrial areas close by, fear not. There are simple, budget-priced ways you can reduce the noise.

Where to start

Carefully examine your walls, windows, floors and doors as these points, especially windows, are where noise seeps in the most. In older properties, in particular, seals, holes and cracks often need replacing or fixing. Happily, caulk or similar can solve these issues and can be a DIY repair. If this has no effect, consider double glazing your windows, although this will be more expensive. Don’t forget to check your home’s insulation too.

Rearrange and shift

If your favourite rooms overlook that annoying train line, consider moving details around. Where you sleep could be relocated to a quieter area at the back of your home as could your preferred relaxation spot. Speaking of relaxing, few things beat noise reduction better than books so don’t delay in relocating your volumes to the line outside walls. Other large furniture pieces such as couches can also help absorb noise.

Beauty spots

Still, hearing the trains and traffic? Enter: noise-absorbing features including thick rugs and heavy curtains. Both of these items can be bought cheap from op shops or picked up from friends and family, and will only add to your property’s smartness and style. If all else fails, try a fan or similar “white noise” item and use earplugs. Or simply, focus on the convenience of your house, with a train line a moment’s walk away, rather than the noise. 

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Tara Searle

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